Recent Images

  • One of the few "pandemic perks" is getting to know your local neighborhood. In the last nine months, I've walked hundreds of kilometers in all directions. If it's within five kilometers of our front door, I've probably walked by. Meridian is a walking suburb. Sidewalks are everywhere, and any sidewalk gaps are always associated with farms and large private lots that predate suburb development. This shot shows one such "gap." In a few months, new houses, filled with California refugees fleeing woke-hole west, will block the view of the Boise foothills. Enjoy the view while you can!

  • Flame deity.

  • The red ray lake wizard emerges.

  • God of Fall.

  • We caught White Dome in the nice morning light. I'll have to go back to the Valley of Fire and do a little hiking. If colored rocks rock you you'll find much to like here.

  • Some sports are better social distancers than others. Except for plays at bases and the plate Baseball players tend to keep their distance. Golf is better, but the ultimate socially distanced "sport" is online gaming. Players don't even need to be on the same continent. I don't consider sitting on your ass playing video games a sport but if Chess is considered a sport only hypocrites would deny gaming.

  • Eliminate the human component.

  • COVID Man. A prime example of an early Anthropocene hirsute elderly caucasian male. Observe the suspicious and accusing gaze. This specimen assumes you're up to no good until there is overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

  • While taking my "constitutional" walk yesterday I came across this LittleFreeLibrary.org (click here) box. It's a cute idea, but I'm guessing book sharing will take a Coronavirus-induced hit. There are people out there that would purposely cough on books before sharing. So, what books should you cough on to up your infection rate? I'd cough on boomer oriented investment books, books old farts read to their snot-nosed grandchildren, and ironically, how to keep healthy books. Yes, I know I'm horrible; it's one of my enduring charms.

  • Looking west from Goodales Cutoff. This is one of the nicer highway views on the highway back from Sun Valley. There are a lot of cutoffs along the old Oregon Trail route. They were supposed to be shortcuts but many were far from it. Look up the Donner Party and read how well their cutoff went.

  • Mali beside the Emily Carr statue on the grounds of the Empress Hotel in Victoria BC. In the 1970s I stayed in the Empress with two Edmonton friends: Bob and Carl Sullivan. In those days the Empress was a bit run down. It wasn't a dive but you could confidently check-in any day of the week without reservations. It's not like that now. On that long-ago visit, we ordered Tea and Crumpets. Room service screwed up the order and delivered three dozen crumpets: a dozen each! That's a lot of crumpets. On this trip, I wanted to sit in the Empress, order Tea and Crumpets again, and toast my now deceased friend Carl. Alas, it wasn't to be. The Empress has gone all upscale and no longer accommodates peons walking in off the street and ordering Crumpets.

  • Looking down on a Seattle freeway from the Columbia Center Tower. One of my pet peeves about observation decks is shooting through glass. At least the Columbia Center windows were fairly clean. Not the like the fingerprinted mess I endured during my last CN Tower visit in Toronto.

  • Noob cube on tube.

  • Icons on icons.

  • Every Christmas, I give myself a little image processing gift. This year I broke down and purchased a copy of Luminar AI (click here). The Luminar AI hype has been relentless! This editor can realistically replace skies, relight images, change a picture’s “mood,” intelligently sharpen detail, insert and remove objects, and feed your household pets. I’m good at ignoring hype but after watching dozens of Two Minute Papers Videos (click here) illustrating clever AI-driven image processing techniques I decided to try Luminar AI. So far, I’m not impressed. Yes, it does a decent job of replacing skies. I never liked the washed-out sky in this old image (click here), so I Luminar’ed in a substitute. Luminar makes this easy, but honestly, I haven't seen it do anything I couldn't pull off in other image editors. Maybe it will win me over with more use.

  • Slices of sumptuous fall.

  • If you cannot stand in the middle of the road and safely compose a picture, your park is too crowded! The mixture of bright red and pale yellows gives the exposed formations of the Valley of Fire a distinctive look. Most of the red rock areas of the Southwest are well red!

  • The Wuhan Coronavirus lockdowns, while largely self-imposed economic clusterfucks, have been good for DIY (Do It Yourself) home improvement projects. I recently completed painting our backyard fence this color. Paint colors are as ridiculously named as suburban neighborhoods. "Old Mill Stream" is a grayish white. I chose it because it matches irrigation water stains you see on neighborhood fences. Fence painting gives one plenty of socially distanced time to think about "life the universe and everything!"

  • Purity of analytic essence!

  • Pandemic shopping has its perks. When all masked up you feel like a bank robber. Even better, ubiquitous store security cameras must be having fits these days. I'm not one of the mask-shit-crazy that equates sensible health precautions with sinister chemtrail-ey authoritarian left-wing government plots. Sadly, the pandemic has not fixed stupid! Still, I feel silly when masked so I don't shop unless absolutely necessary. In this, I'm not alone. Abstaining from purchasing consumer crap has done wonders for those lucky enough to have savings.

  • Typing on my first home terminal with my friend Bob in 1980. I was ahead of the gadget adoption curve in my wasted youth. I started using email in the 1970s. I had home terminals in the early 1980s and I purchased the very first 512K Mac sold in Edmonton Alberta a few years after this picture was taken. I believed such devices would change the world and unfortunately I was right. Sadly, I didn't foresee abominations like Twitter, Facebook and Porn Hub. Nor did I anticipate the relentless cyber-surveillance we are all enduring. In six months my little Brave Brower phone app has blocked over 120,000 tracker attempts. That's a lot of tracking attempts for one person with average or below average phone habits. If only you could catch the Wuhan Coronavirus or even better Ebola from your phone; that would fix a lot of this cyber bullshit.

  • Mali on stop of a Ponderosa Park stop sign that's burid in snow. The snow was a least five feet deep in the park. McCall gets a lot more snow than southern Idaho.

  • Looking northwest over Seattle's waterfront from the Columbia Center observation floor.

  • The BC Legislature in Victoria. Because I tend not to dwell on doings of dolts I lost sight of the pertinent fact that the capital of British Columbia is on an island. Actually, it explains a lot. Island dwellers, as I have noted before, are demonstrably nuttier than mainlanders. Coastal people, especially in North Ameria, are demonstrably crazier than inlanders. When you add insular island idiocy to coastal crazy the longstanding bat shit insanity of BC politics makes sense.

  • Down the worm hole bitches.

  • My what strange treasures slither about!

  • The author copies of my recently published book arrived today. You can order it from Amazon (click here). Finishing this book and the software it documents has been on my TODO list for ages. Ironically, the Wuhan coronavirus lockdowns created an ideal book editing environment.

  • For some reason, this blue paint style rendering of my ugly mug is one of my "most liked" images on DeepDreamGenerator.com. In the first few months of the China virus lockdowns, I grew a beard: the first beard of my life only to discover that beards require far more maintenance than I am willing to invest in facial hair. The beard is gone, but the social distancing remains.

  • We drove down to Las Vegas last weekend to check on my father. It was our first COVID road trip. Gassing up cars while wearing "Chin Diapers" (South Park's inspired term for masks) feels every bit as stupid as it sounds. COVID Vegas is dull. You cannot hang out in casinos, mingle in crowds, see shows, or go to restaurants without risking infection, but you can safely tour the supremely socially distanced Nevada desert so, we took a short detour on the way home and saw the Valley of Fire State Park about an hour out of Vegas. The rock colors are not exaggerated or pumped up here; they are bright red!

  • Assume corruption.

  • Complexity is lost on icons. Simple designs work best when scaled down.

  • Testing direct upload editing.

  • A before and after of my restoration of a 1908 print of my great-grandparents Bert and Minnie Raver with two of their children. As you can see I have altered the print's aspect ratio. I did this for two reasons: the 4x5 ratio better emphasizes the people and the more pixels you can cut out the fewer you have to edit. The original print was covered with thousands of tiny black spots. I inpainted most of them away and then "buzzed the background", (a blur followed with a grain matching addition of noise), to suppress the rest.

  • Mali wanted to try snowshowing so we spent the weekend in McCall. The snow was four to five feet deep in Ponderosa Park and there were many groomed trails.

  • A small flock of crows flying over Horseshoe Bay.

  • Tablet posing on the upper deck of a BC ferry at dusk.

  • Sine guard.

  • The eye enhancement features of Luminar AI are fun and may prove useful. Here I replaced the dark pit eyes of the original (click here) with fake enlarged-eyes. The result is obviously over the top, but a lighter touch on less aggressively edited images could work.

  • A homage to all the systems used by jodliterate (click here). From one of Duane Bibby's (click here) famous LaTeX lion drawings.

  • Fall is my favorite season. It's not stark like winter, or immature like spring or decadent like summer. Fall is mature, magnificent, and measured as it slips away.

  • I cast my second absentee ballot the other day. I am way past the point of swallowing bilge like "every vote counts." The dipshits that mouth such sentiments ignore the fact that many ballots go uncounted. So how exactly do they count? The fundamental problem with voting systems is that you, and I mean only you, cannot check your vote. You "trust" (trust is for imbeciles) that your vote is accurately counted, but you cannot verify that this is indeed the case. It doesn't have to be like this, and if the US election turns into the shitshow many are expecting, maybe we will move to mathematically secured voting systems in the, let's hope, not too distant future.

  • Relentless verification.

  • Anal retention.

  • While many have been suffering during the Coronavirus lock-down I've been enjoying myself. I was built for social distancing. BV (Before Virus) I looked for excuses to avoid people now I'm a "hero" for avoiding you! And, while many have been losing their jobs and watching their businesses implode I've been busier than ever. To bring in a little extra retirement money I went back to work at an undisclosed secure IT location. This time around I was completely honest during the interview process and told my would-be employers that I would work for them on my terms: no SOX, no begging for rights to install software or manage databases, no pointless administrative bullshit and, additionally, I want to be paid by the hour with complete flexibility to choose my hours. To my utter surprise, they went for it so during the lock-down I've worked harder and have achieved more than I did in my previous five years of employment. I've actually been having fun working! Who knew the end of the world would enhance productivity. Some assholes always prosper while others suffer. During this plague, I'm one of those assholes.

  • Two of my great-grandparents, Bert and Minnie Raver, with two of their children Vernon and Elizabeth Raver. Elizabeth, the baby girl on Bert's lap, lived until she was ninety-nine. She was born in 1906 and looks around two here so I figure this portrait was made in 1908. Elizabeth's mother also enjoyed a long life and died at the age of ninety-six. I am continually amazed at the quality of these old portraits. Studio photographers in the early 1900s knew what they were doing.

  • Lake Payette in McCall covered with snow. McCall is good place to enjoy winter. There are two ski resorts within twenty kilometers and a large state park loaded with cross country and snow trails right in town. There's also a free Little Ski Hill where some US Olympic Ski team members started their careers.

  • Mali on the Seattle waterfront near the ferris wheel. City ferris wheels are spinning everywhere these days.

  • Looking up near Seattle's Columbia Center: the black tower on the right.

  • Canned exoplanets.

  • More Luminar AI hacking. Here I swapped out a dull blue cloudless sky (click here) for a more punchy one. Sky swapping will probably work best for moving clouds around in the same light. The sky enhancement feature also does a fairly decent job of bringing out stucture in overexposed cloud highlights without unduly wreaking the rest of the image. This editor may find a place in my toolbox afterall.

  • The front cover of a new edition of the J Object Dictionary; I finally completed all my planned JOD "verbs" and rewrote parts of the original manual. You can order this book from Amazon (click here). If the preceding link does not work, search Amazon books for ISBN-13: 979-8554921117. You can also search with Amazon's ASIN key B08M2KBMND. More information about JOD can be found by following the links on The JOD Page (click here).

  • Mali, walking on a cream-colored rock surface. If you look closely, you can see her Winnie the Wuhan "chin diaper" hanging from her ear. People were visiting the Valley of Fire, but it was easy to keep your distance. I wonder what excuse I'll use to keep my distance when the Coronavirus finally abates?

  • Wuhan waste! Plastic pollution has taken new forms in our brave new masked world, but one thing remains the same: people still litter. I'm thinking a just punishment is forcing litterers to wear discarded masks.

  • I do what I do because I am what I am!

  • The devil inside.

  • Crayon goddesses.

  • Snowmobile tracks on a hill just south of Stanley. We wanted to get a good look at the Sawtooths in winter but they were fogged out so these criss-crossing tracks had to do.

  • Totally totem!

  • Dual metal narcissistic nudes.

  • Seattle Art Museum hammering street giant sculpture.




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