Analyze the Data not the Drivel

Recent Images

  • Crayon goddesses.

  • Snowmobile tracks on a hill just south of Stanley. We wanted to get a good look at the Sawtooths in winter but they were fogged out so these criss-crossing tracks had to do.

  • The worm turns.

  • Mali on the Seattle waterfront near the ferris wheel. City ferris wheels are spinning everywhere these days.

  • Seattle Art Museum hammering street giant sculpture.

  • Seattle waterfront.

  • Contrary to appearances the streets of Seattle are not paved with gold.

  • I'm pretty sure that if a white guy had carved this totem he would be immediately "canceled" for the heinous crimes of cultural appropriation and sculptural blackface but fortunately, first nation artists are exempt from woke nonsense.

  • Flying around Vancouver in a floatplane is one of TripAdvisor's top ten tourist activities. Of course, flying is one of the major greenie weenie sins so your flight's evil CO2 emissions are canceled with an impotent conscience soothing "carbon offset." Global warming, something that might kill you in a few centuries, requires an immediate response. The Coronavirus, something that might kill you next week; well it's too early for inconvenient travel restrictions. Priorities people!

  • Mali Kerry Park Seattle overlook.

  • Seattle has a relatively compact downtown. It doesn't take long to walk all over the city which is a good thing because driving, and especially parking, is the standard urban nightmare.

  • It's been over forty years since I last ferried over to Victoria. Ticket prices reflect the relentless debasement of currencies. It's now almost a hundred Canadian for a one-way ferry ride. In another forty years, it will be over five hundred. Economists assure me the ever-shrinking dollar is a good thing. God forbid money should retain its value. Perhaps we should gather all the "inflation is good for you economists" on a large ferry and torpedo it!

  • While taking my "constitutional" walk yesterday I came across this LittleFreeLibrary.org box. It's a cute idea but I'm guessing book sharing will take a Coronavirus induced hit. There are people out there that would purposely cough on books before sharing which begs the question which books should you cough on to up your infection rate? I'd cough on boomer oriented investment books, books old farts would read to their snot-nosed grandchildren and ironically how to keep healthy books. Yes, I know I'm horrible; it's one of my enduring charms.

  • Looking west from Goodales Cutoff. This is one of the nicer highway views on the highway back from Sun Valley. There are a lot of cutoffs along the old Oregon Trail route. They were supposed to be shortcuts but many were far from it. Look up the Donner Party and read how well their cutoff went.

  • Totally totem!

  • Looking down on a Seattle freeway from the Columbia Center Tower. One of my pet peeves about observation decks is shooting through glass. At least the Columbia Center windows were fairly clean. Not the like the fingerprinted mess I endured during my last CN Tower visit in Toronto.

  • The right cloud at the right time seems alive.

  • Stop looking at me!

  • Seattle Ferris Wheel at dusk,

  • Stanley Park sculpture profile.

  • Residual Christmas.

  • Low man on the totem pole.

  • Me in the Columbia Center Tower in Seattle. One of the fastest ways to absorb a cityscape is to see it from above.

  • We were the last car on the Ferry from Vancouver Island. One of the big downsides of island living: you're stuck on a damn island! Even worse, island people often suffer from Insular Island Syndrome. They believe they're in the center of the best of all worlds. Normally such delusions land you in looney bins so it's just as well the afflicted come pre-quarantined on their dinky islands.

  • Typing on my first home terminal with my friend Bob in 1980. I was ahead of the gadget adoption curve in my wasted youth. I started using email in the 1970s. I had home terminals in the early 1980s and I purchased the very first 512K Mac sold in Edmonton Alberta a few years after this picture was taken. I believed such devices would change the world and unfortunately I was right. Sadly, I didn't foresee abominations like Twitter, Facebook and Porn Hub. Nor did I anticipate the relentless cyber-surveillance we are all enduring. In six months my little Brave Brower phone app has blocked over 120,000 tracker attempts. That's a lot of tracking attempts for one person with average or below average phone habits. If only you could catch the Wuhan Coronavirus or even better Ebola from your phone; that would fix a lot of this cyber bullshit.

  • Mali on stop of a Ponderosa Park stop sign that's burid in snow. The snow was a least five feet deep in the park. McCall gets a lot more snow than southern Idaho.

  • Mali beside the Emily Carr statue on the grounds of the Empress Hotel in Victoria BC. In the 1970s I stayed in the Empress with two Edmonton friends: Bob and Carl Sullivan. In those days the Empress was a bit run down. It wasn't a dive but you could confidently check-in any day of the week without reservations. It's not like that now. On that long-ago visit, we ordered Tea and Crumpets. Room service screwed up the order and delivered three dozen crumpets: a dozen each! That's a lot of crumpets. On this trip, I wanted to sit in the Empress, order Tea and Crumpets again, and toast my now deceased friend Carl. Alas, it wasn't to be. The Empress has gone all upscale and no longer accommodates peons walking in off the street and ordering Crumpets.

  • The BC Legislature in Victoria. Because I tend not to dwell on doings of dolts I lost sight of the pertinent fact that the capital of British Columbia is on an island. Actually, it explains a lot. Island dwellers, as I have noted before, are demonstrably nuttier than mainlanders. Coastal people, especially in North Ameria, are demonstrably crazier than inlanders. When you add insular island idiocy to coastal crazy the longstanding bat shit insanity of BC politics makes sense.

  • Gathering darkness on the ferry from Vancouver Island.

  • A gigantic white head in Seattle's Olympic Sculpture Park.

  • My shiny object affliction extends to neon signs.

  • Astonished totem face.

  • Yakima alley art. Some of the best working artists choose the street as their canvas.

  • We spent a few hours walking around Victoria. I visited Victoria a few times in the 1970s, more than forty years ago. The city has changed but not as much as expected. Somewhere near this bridge, I shot this slide (click here). I wanted to return to the same spot but the bridge has been replaced.

  • It's true, anyone can grow up to be a shit artist!

  • Mali on the upper deck of a BC Ferry. We popped over to Victoria for "no particular reason." I enjoy boat rides when they are going somewhere. Cruising just to cruise is like being in Hotel California: you can check in but you cannot check out.

  • A before and after of my restoration of a 1908 print of my great-grandparents Bert and Minnie Raver with two of their children. As you can see I have altered the print's aspect ratio. I did this for two reasons: the 4x5 ratio better emphasizes the people and the more pixels you can cut out the fewer you have to edit. The original print was covered with thousands of tiny black spots. I inpainted most of them away and then "buzzed the background", (a blur followed with a grain matching addition of noise), to suppress the rest.

  • Mali wanted to try snowshowing so we spent the weekend in McCall. The snow was four to five feet deep in Ponderosa Park and there were many groomed trails.

  • Looking northwest over Seattle's waterfront from the Columbia Center observation floor.

  • Tablet posing on the upper deck of a BC ferry at dusk.

  • We drove up the West Vancouver coastal highway to the ferry terminal to see if one of Mali's nephews was still working in a nearby cafe. We didn't find her nephew but the view from Horseshoe Bay was striking enough for a quick walk-by panorama.

  • Diversity!

  • Seattle Public Market.

  • Brown arms cradling a snake creature on a Stanley Park Totem Pole.

  • Red needling.

  • Mali Seattle street selfie.

  • Just to be clear our civilization specializes in redundant moron warnings.

  • Mahin ghost dream.

  • Two of my great-grandparents, Bert and Minnie Raver, with two of their children Vernon and Elizabeth Raver. Elizabeth, the baby girl on Bert's lap, lived until she was ninety-nine. She was born in 1906 and looks around two here so I figure this portrait was made in 1908. Elizabeth's mother also enjoyed a long life and died at the age of ninety-six. I am continually amazed at the quality of these old portraits. Studio photographers in the early 1900s knew what they were doing.

  • Lake Payette in McCall covered with snow. McCall is good place to enjoy winter. There are two ski resorts within twenty kilometers and a large state park loaded with cross country and snow trails right in town. There's also a free Little Ski Hill where some US Olympic Ski team members started their careers.

  • A small flock of crows flying over Horseshoe Bay.

  • Looking up near Seattle's Columbia Center: the black tower on the right.

  • Stanley Park totem profile.

  • Seattle street market fabrics in the wind.

  • Vancouver from Stanley Park.

  • Stanley Park Totem Pole detail.

  • An interesting partially transparent windbreak in the Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle. This image looks like a digital filter has been applied but it's close to what the eye sees when visiting this spot.

  • When Mali booked us into the O'Canada House Bed and Breakfast I thought the name was pure marketing. It turns out that the first politically incorrect version of O'Canada was written here. Of course, the lyrics have changed, (several times), as Canada has grown gayer and more inclusively deranged. CBC radio in Vancouver prattled on about the importance of lifting the HIV positive blood donation ban for the LGBTQ community because apparently, it makes them feel bad about themselves. Note to self: avoid blood transfusions in BC.

  • Me in Stanley Park near the Teahouse.

  • Walking through the Boise State campus we came across the Big B.




Powered by SmugMug Owner Log In