Analyze the Data not the Drivel

Recent Images

  • Room interiors are nostalgia enhancing. This 1987 shot was made in the living room of 1983 Downview Drive in Glenburnie Ontario. I am petting my dog Lady while surrounded by my daughter's toys. The shelves on the left also appear in this interior shot (click here) taken in Edmonton. They, along with the decorations on the walls and much of the furniture in the room were dragged across Canada when we moved east.

  • Holding a cold Pantanal moth.

  • Helen as a toddler artist. She maintained an artistic streak as a grown up. Last month she published her first novel. (Click here) to get a copy.

  • Carl in his Edmonton basement apartment. For many years Carl lived in the basement apartment of Bob's house. His rent helped cover the mortgage and other expenses.

  • The wet red street cobblestones in front of this small Pocone cafe got my attention.

  • The golden path may lead nowhere.

  • Age of surveillance irony.

  • Many years ago my mother gave me this birthstone ring. Somewhere and somewhen I lost track of it yet like Tolkein's ringwraiths I still feel its presence. This image is one of half a dozen old 35mm slides I shot using a 50mm lens and old fashioned lens extension tubes.

  • Wupatki ruins in northern Arizona. The ruins, rocks and sky appeal to me but the fence shadows in the foreground break the spell. I was tempted to edit out the shadows but such imperfections make images credible.

  • Late afternoon sunlight on a decorated Royal Military College window in Kingston Ontario.

  • Evelyn, Mali and Frank watching a Sedona sunset.

  • A young Enewetak Islander boy holding a baby.

  • I have more fun hacking around with Improvised Imaging Devices (IIDs) than regular cameras. Some time ago I foolishly bought a cheap Best Buy macro addon lens for my iPhone. I didn't expect much and I didn't get much. The cheap plastic lenses were a nightmare and the damn thing barely fit the phone. Last night while fiddling around with my jeweler's loupe I wondered if I could shoot iPhone shots through it. The answer is yes. The loupe vignettes like a vigilante, (call the alliteration police), but parts of the image are very sharp and the magnification is high. This picture is a collage of test shots. I am amused!

  • A Cusco street light at dusk.

  • Beely, after Beelzebub, liked lying on my bookshelf. One day his "Ok Boomer" expression got my attention. I still have some of these books (2019) alas poor Beely was hit by a car in Glenburnie Ontario about five years after this picture was taken. I buried him in our garden with his favorite food bowl. Like many cats, he never missed a meal.

  • Me crossing a stream in the Canadian Rockies. I cannot remember exactly what trail this was but I remember running into a newly married couple. The husband was a recent Russian immigrant to Canada. He approved of Robin William's portrayal of a Russin in a recent film. Old photographs rattle and twist out memories: it's part of the fun.

  • Cassie, one of our better beasts. I've had several dogs and three stand out. Cassie is one of them. She was a small short-haired mongrel that we picked up from the pound. Cassie loved swimming and she was a total alpha bitch. Despite being the size of a small border collie she completely dominated any dog she crossed paths with. I always got a kick out of how she bent larger, and supposedly tougher critters, to her will. She was tough on other dogs but was a real sweetheart with people.

  • Jacob in a life jacket at the cottage.

  • In 1969 I used to wander the hills around our house in MIS Iran with my fixed focus Instamatic Camera (click here). The Instamatic was easily one of the worst cameras I have ever used but it still snagged some of my favorite old shots like this somber snapshot of two walking men. I wonder what happened to these fellows. If they're still alive they're in their eighties or older.

  • Bob Blaxley in Carl's Edmonton basement apartment.

  • Looking north over the red rock-strewn plains of Arizona's Wupatki National Monument at boiling distant storm clouds.

  • Deer in a Quebec wild animal park near Ottawa.

  • The Red Rock Canyon in southern Alberta is very colorful and has one of the most conspicuous rock boundaries you will find anywhere. Here I'm standing on the boundary.

  • Miriam, Ruth's younger sister, reading on the patio of the Mid Pacific Marine Lab in 1981. In the early 1980s I was on two trips to Enewetak atoll to ostensibly collect sponge samples for a cancer research project but really to pursue the best diving the planet has to offer. Miriam was an excellent scuba diver. She was very calm in the water and consumed less air that the rest of us. I know she would not approve of this picture. She was always conscious of her weight and like many overweight people spent a lifetime on and off diets. There was always a touch of sadness about Miriam. She often felt like the odd sibling out. Her older brothers and sister all became very successful professionals something that made her both proud and envious. Many years after this picture was taken she had a major falling out with her older sister and they didn't speak for years. Then, quite unexpectedly, Miriam reappeared with ovarian cancer. They had a few weeks to reconcile before Miriam died in her early fifties. It surprised everyone that knew her and many of us still find it hard to believe she's gone.

  • Frankly I haven't made up my mind.

  • My cousin Dale's wife holding baby Ian. Snapped near Seattle Washingston in 2000.

  • Me with my two cats Beely and Stippy.

  • In December of 1974, I made my only trip to Cape Canaveral to visit the Kennedy Space Center. It had been only two years since Apollo 17's return from the Moon but the space center already had the decrepit feel of an abandoned ruin. Rockets, like these, were being turned into sad lawn ornaments. By 1974 the public had lost interest in space exploration. Many saw the effort as a giant waste of money. The left despised and reviled the program largely because it succeeded. Americans walked on the Moon, Soviets did not: an embarrassment that helped spawn idiotic, "it was all done in a sound stage," conspiracies that are still circulating. It's been a long fifty years but we are finally coming out of our self-induced space exploration coma. In the next ten years, somebody, (probably not Americans), will finally return to the Moon.

  • Helen and Melanie playing in the sand of Picton's North Beach.

  • I've been experimenting with 10 stop neutral density filters and long exposures. Here I am twirling in a string of blue Christmas lights. My body is invisible and you should be thankful as I was nude. Yes, I am a dirty old man! I was hoping for a blurry ghost but ended up with Tinker Bell on crack cocaine. The Nikon remote app Snapbridge cannot control exposures longer than 30 seconds: disappointing. When will photo app developers get it through their thick Millenial skulls that the user, (photographers), should have absolute and unquestioned control of their cameras? If I want to set the device to self-destruct it is none of your business!

  • Who knew there was a bowling congress? You can mock bowling all you want but the criterion for excellence is clear: count the damn pins. With such clarity, I'm willing to bet everything I have at ten to one odds that this congress was (is) far less corrupt than the one in DC.

  • During the many years I lived in Edmonton and Calgary I often drove down to Livingston and Bozeman Montana to visit relatives. A prominent landmark on the way is the High-Level Bridge in Lethbridge. This rail bridge has appeared in many photographs and movies. It appears in the Days of Heaven, a dreadful Richard Gere abomination that tried to pass off the Lethbridge and Drumheller valleys in southern Alberta as the north Texas panhandle. I’ve seen both locales and trust me they do not match. How do geologists watch movies guilty of the crime of landscape substitution without cringing?

  • Red stone and gnarly wood cannot be resisted.

  • Mali, Combiz and Sedi in Ottawa 2004.

  • Jacob clowning for the camera near a Yellowstone Canyon overlook.

  • My grandmother Helen asked me to photograph this oil portrait of Lucy Ames (1809-1888) in 1971. Lucy was the wife of Dr. Gilbert, (we don't know his full name). Lucy and Dr. Gilbert are great-great-great-grandparents of mine. I don't know when this was painted. Lucy looks at least sixty here so I'm guessing in the 1860s or 1870s.

  • The Shadow Knows!

  • Two red-dressed Christmas Helens. Helen Hamilton, Marion's sister, is one of the Helens my daughter is named after; the other Helen being my paternal grandmother. This was our first Christmas in our Glenburnie house. The rocking horse in the foreground was Helen senior's gift to my daughter. My kids rode that hobby horse hard for years.

  • Pat Bowne reclining on a quilt she made in our Edmonton basement apartment that she rented for a few years while she attended graduate school. Pat was a good friend with a good sense of humor. She was a big fan of SCTV's Celebrity Farm Blowup: a skit where celebrities were invited on TV and then blown up. Afterward, the hosts would say, "She blew up real good!"

  • The land around Pantanal Fazendas was flat, wet and green.

  • A Pantanal Fazenda. The small ranch houses in the Pantanal region of Brazil reminded me of similar dwellings in rural Montana. Living in remote rural areas has its charms all over the planet.

  • The latest bugfix release of Darktable (2.6.3) has reinforced my opinion that this program is currently the fastest way to prune thousands of RAWS. It is noticeably zippier than Lightroom, Rawtherapee, Thumbsplus and other tools I use. As a quick test I imported thousands of images I shot in New Mexico and then zipped through them tagging a few pictures, like this ceramic gecko, that made me look twice. I will now prune in Darktable but I will continue to use other programs on surviving files because each program imparts a slightly different look and you can never have enough looks.

  • Rio Botanical Gardens in 1979.

  • Sedona red rock ladies.

  • While framing a rather dull government building I saw that its reflection in a street puddle was more interesting.

  • A mural in the Grand Canyon Tower museum.

  • Helen on a ledge overlooking Pine Creek Lake in Montana.

  • My third attempt this year to hike the new Grand Prismatic Spring Overlook Trail in Yellowstone was thwarted by bear warnings. It just hasn't been my year. I briefly considered ignoring this warning and walking the trail anyway but I have spent a lifetime mocking morons behaving dangerously in Yellowstone. Joining such a club would not be a good look.

  • Jesus Dupont Christopher Halsacous Christ!

  • The two Guthorms meet. Jacob's middle name comes from his great grandfather Guthorm (Gert) seen here in his early eighties. The pictures on the walls and shelves around Gert are his children, grandchildren, and wife Hazel. Gert was universally loved by family, inlaws, and friends but oddly Jacob was the first and only descendant to carry on his name.

  • Bob Blaxley fishing on the coast of British Columbia in 1975. Human beings divide into two camps: those that fish seriously and the rest of us. Bob was (is) very much a member of the first camp. The world would be a calmer and more peaceful place if more people went fishing. Fishing calms the mind, teaches patience and nurtures a love for wild places.

  • Termite mounds dotted the Pantanal landscape. Many were bigger than this one. I've seen similar mounds in Africa. The color of the structures vary with soil and termite species.

  • Two observations: 1. People eat for more piranhas than piranhas eat people. 2. When fishing for piranhas you don't have to wait long for bites.

  • Gecko wave function collapse.

  • Bling wave.

  • Mali crouching in a corner of the Wupatki ruins.

  • It wouldn't surprise me to learn that this parking garage history lesson is more comprehensive and accurate than what's taught in high school classes these days. The PC age is almost as bad as good old fashioned commie and fascist propaganda when it comes to distorting the historical record.

  • My mother beside a cheesy Sedona store elk sculpture. Her knees were bothering here but she was still in fairly good health in 2004. A few years later her Crohn's disease ordeal began.

  • Backlighting is a good look on some house plants.

  • A rare confluence of siblings.




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