Analyze the Data not the Drivel

Recent Images

  • Bogus Bogus Basin bouquet.

  • Me on the south bank of the river valley near Edmonton's High Level Bridge in 1977.

  • I leaned over the pedestrian railing of the new Interstate bridge south of the Hoover dam to squeeze off the frames that went into this panorama of the bridge's shadow on the canyon walls.

  • I've learned that marginal, or just plain ghastly pictures, can be used as base images for digital hacks. Though you cannot make it out the figure, outlined in red Voronoi cells, standing below the cross-shaped cliff tomb is my sister taking a picture on our sole visit to Iran's famous cliffside tombs in 1966.

  • Portrait accidents can be more interesting than what you intended.

  • Mali wanted to check out a lavender festival in Eagle today so we drove over. The lavender flowers were fine but the ten dollar walk around fee annoyed Mali.

  • I have made an exception to my "no Adobe" image processing boycott. When Adobe adopted their "let's charge rent forever" gouge for Lightroom I started using other RAW developers particularly RawTherapee. Most Adobe products are overpriced and overrated but their mobile apps may be an exception. The iPhone app Photoshop Express is free. Of course, it nags you to buy the expensive stuff and it probably spies on you like many phone apps but it is fun and enables basic photo editing on your phone.

  • This is the first flight I can remember. My grandmother snapped this slide as she was putting me on an old DC-3 in Billings Montana back in 1965. I believe the destination was Salt Lake. I remember worrying about crashing right after fastening my seat belt. Something that still crosses my mind every time I get on a plane.

  • I always feel guilty when cropping old photographs. Most of the time I just trim uneven edges and exclude poorly framed blocks of sky and ground but sometimes I cut out possibly important content. When restoring this old shot of Frank and Helen beside a rail car I cut away the "half men" on the left and the "half child" on the right. This crop results in a better-framed picture of Helen and Frank but the omissions, especially the half child that may be Frank and Helen's daughter Janice, change the nature of the print and make it more an interpretation than a restoration.

  • A free music and craft festival celebrating immigrants to Idaho was held on the grounds of the Idaho capitol today. One of the bands was Iranian so Mali wanted to check them out. In addition to free music, many vendors were selling colorful crafts from Africa, India, and Indonesia.

  • The Boise foothills are still blooming. I enjoy and admire people that invest time and energy in flower gardens but sadly wildflowers equal or surpass the best of our efforts for free.

  • Brooding skies to the west of Cathedral Gorge.

  • We were up in the hills hiking around the Bogus Basin mountains this morning. The hills were festooned with flowers. Here I'm looking north. There was just enough haze in the air to render a nice natural blur.

  • I've always been a sucker for shadows. Mali and I are casting late afternoon shadows on the grounds of the Taos Pueblo.

  • Ann and Reza near the Hogs Back in Ottawa. We video chat with Ann and Reza fairly often but the other day we were wondering when was the last time we saw them in person. 2005 was the last time I saw them in person. Mali has seen them more recently.

  • Iranian oilfield workers handling drilling mud bags in 1968. It’s not well known but drilling mud is an unsung oil business hero. It simply would not be possible to drill most oil wells without it. It lubricates drill pipes and suppresses blowouts. Mud chemistry is complex and demanding and a vast mud supply industry works quietly in the background making the entire petroleum enterprise possible. Take away drilling mud and the global economy and green gas emissions will simultaneously collapse.

  • We endured a weekend of car problems. My little pickup “Red Neck” broke down going east on I84 just after the Malad Gorge bridge. I called a nearby auto repair shop to get the vehicle off the Interstate and see if they could fix it. My wife picked me up at the repair shop in our little car “Baby Blue” and we continued to Bozeman. Shortly after leaving West Yellowstone Baby Blue’s muffler went bad. So Baby Blue got a new muffler and Red Neck got a new alternator and battery. Cars are expensive money pits! No doubt you’ve read breathless articles about how millennials are abandoning horrid carbon dioxide emitting cars for ride-sharing and public transit. The implication is that they are doing this to save the planet. It’s pure bullshit. Millennials, being the poorest of living generations, really don’t have a choice. Cars are so damn expensive that anyone making less than sixty thousand per year should reconsider walking.

  • Luscious linear lavender looming.

  • Bogus blatant blue boy bottle beacons.

  • Mali grew these little orange potted flowers from seed. She says looking at them makes her feel happy.

  • Frank and Helen beside a rail car in the early 1930s. This is a restored version of an old faded print I found while sorting through my parent's storage. The print is not dated but there is a developer stamp. It was printed by the Photo Department of the Brenner Drug Company in Glendive Montana. I am guessing it was taken in the early 1930s because the uncropped version appears to have a "half child" on the right edge of the frame that may be Janice. Janice drowned in the 1930s.

  • Me squinting in the afternoon sun above Palm Springs. When you ride the Palm Springs cable car you start in a desert and go up to a ponderosa pine forest.

  • My contempt for political creatures goes way back. I was jaded long before high school and my opinions about the "things" that seek to rule me have only hardened over the decades. It's no coincidence that the two dozen nonentities seeking the Democratic presidential nomination (June 2019) remind you of high school student council candidates. The same slimy little punks that ran for student body positions often transition into big bitch politics with predictable results. I'd had enough of this by the tender age of seventeen so I, along with other bitter cynics, organized a high school campaign to abolish student government by electing a "neutered puppet dictator" pictured here. Our "mouse-ist" campaign, (we enjoyed mocking moronic Maoists), was enthusiastically embraced and we might have elected a dictator if the school administration had not intervened and outlawed our candidate. Proper democracies don't just let anyone run!

  • Tahoe and tree.

  • On every visit to Bogus Basin trails different flowers are blooming.

  • Yosemite's el Capitan is probably the most heavily photographed chunk of granite on the planet.

  • Me and Jacob posing at Point Fredrick Kingston Ontario in 2004.

  • My mother collected wooden animals while touring in East Africa. For years they roamed free on her mantel and display cases. Family members took a few smaller carvings but we've decided to free the beasts. They will be sold with other items of the estate and will probably end up prowling in other homes. I hope the new owners will enjoy them as much as my mother did.

  • On one of our trips to Enewetak, we took a small supply freighter from Kwajalein to Enewetak. Until that trip, I thought I was immune to seasickness. I had been on many boats and ships but the supply ship was just the right size, about 35 meters long and 10 meters wide, to hit my resonant sickness frequency. The seas were mild, it was the mid-Pacific after all, but they were wavy enough to drive me below decks where I pressed my face into my bunk pillow and tried not to throw up on the overnight trip to Enewetak. I was delighted to come above decks on the morning of our arrival and take this shot.

  • Sunlight from the side casts sharp shadows and exposes detail. I'll have to to do more light hacking.

  • My mother Evelyn Eggar 1935-2013 around six months of age. Even though she is only a baby here her smile would be instantly recognizable to anyone that knew her at any age.

  • Mali took me out to my favorite local “meat on a stick” restaurant to celebrate my full social security retirement age birthday. As a former full-time software guy, I’ve been reluctant to disclose my age for the simple reason that age discrimination is real. Managerial types seldom accuse old farts of being stupid or slow. Their main complaint is that we cannot be bullied. I simply will not buy into self-serving corporate bullshit and I haven’t been shy about letting people know. I’ve never been good serf material and age has only enhanced my bad attitude. Fortunately, management will no longer have to deal with me. I am retired. My new mission in life is to claw back every single tax dollar I ever paid, with interest, and to leave the governments of the world a giant fucking uncollectable I owe you when I expire. And, this is so sweet, the dumb shits have made it easy. Retirement programs like Social Security and Medicare are already fiscally unsound. All you have to do is to live long enough and you will automatically sodomize government. Financial retards are still in denial about this but you cannot win wars with arithmetic. These programs will either be inflated away, reformed to lower benefits, or tax donkeys will pay a lot more. It sucks to work in a welfare state! Given this dire situation, the only rational response is to loot these programs while you can. If that isn’t a birthday present worth celebrating what is?

  • While working through my late mother's storage I came across more of Hazel's photos. This is my mother at six in 1941. Many girls in the late 1930s and early 1940s sported a Shirley Temple look. This print is similar to another small print in this gallery which I dated to 1940. As I have said many times the dates on these old shots are estimates. Only a handful are dated and the dates are typically print dates which differ from capture dates. EXIF didn't exist in the 1940s.

  • Alberta enjoying a coke in Phoenix Arizona with Earl in 1949.

  • Exposure accidents can produce images that are far more interesting than properly exposed shots. My father double exposed the Parthenon when we visited it in August of 1969. I am sure this was not what he intended but the resulting superposition of times makes you look twice. When tourists visit ancient sites they are indulging in a bit of imaginary time travel. This double exposure of instants separated by a handful of seconds is of no great value but imagine a camera that could double expose the present with what you could see from this very spot when the Parthenon was first built. The resulting image would instantly become the most valuable photograph ever taken.

  • We stopped at Cathedral Gorge State Park on the way back from Vegas. Rain storms were looming to the north making for an interesting mix of light.

  • Basic bokeh bloom bitches!

  • Mono Lake is paradise for brine flies.

  • My first digital camera was a one megapixel HP that produced only jpeg files. The image quality sucked compared to 35mm film cameras but that crappy little digital camera facilitated shots that were a pain in the ass with film. This panorama was built from six snapshots taken in southern Minnesota overlooking the Mississippi River. I use these frames to test how panorama software changes. Back in 2001, I had to tediously set my own control points, adjust the exposures of each frame, and then edit remaining ghosts. It was a chore and the final result was always embarrassing. Today I simply opened the original jpegs in Affinity Photo’s panorama tool and let it do all the work. The result is better than any of my original versions.

  • Late afternoon sunlight forced me to scan this Bozeman mural.

  • Me giving an Eagle street sculpture a finger.

  • Mali has joined a meetup group. Members go on hikes and organize the odd social event. Here we are at a Fat Tuesday Mardi Gras social wearing silly masks and playing Mexican Dominoes. Old people, am I right?

  • Gert and Hazel on the front lawn of our Salt Lake City house in 1962. My siblings and I always looked forward to grandparent visits. They were just more fun than our parents.

  • Hazel and Gert around the time they were married in 1931.

  • We were over in Bozeman the last few days taking care of some family business. After dinner, I spotted this delightful politically incorrect, SJW triggering, sexist Vodka Ad. Yet another reason to love Montana. My wife is currently listening to the first Democratic clown car debate. I'm pretty sure the driveling idiocy would go down better with a half dozen shots of this huckleberry.

  • Gert kneeling on grass in 1948. The more I work with my grandmother Hazel's Kodachromes the more I appreciate her talent for impromptu people pictures.

  • My first mother-in-law loved to cut back brush at her cottage. As she got older the task of bushwacking fell to other family members and inlaws. Here I am firing up a bush massacring chain saw while my useless black dog Charlie crouches in the foreground and my kids aimlessly wander in the background. I have fond memories of all my dogs with the sole exception of Charlie. Charlie was a pathetic creature. My daughter picked him out of the pound as a reward for enduring a painful medical test. Charlie bonded very tightly with my first wife and suffered severe separation anxiety when she wasn't around. Once he chewed up the Venetian blinds in our sunroom. Chewing the blinds was bad enough but he cut his mouth while doing it and then bled all over the house. Charlie was a freaking joy.

  • Mali and John above Lake Tahoe.

  • Some of Mali's hiking friends posing near the Bogus Basin cabin.

  • A simple high key portrait of Mali.

  • Mali looking through binoculars near the Wisconsin and Minnesota border.

  • On our way home we stopped by the Livingston Cemetary to clean my mother's grave and leave some of her favorite ceramic flowers on the headstone. Mali used cheap vegetable oil to remove the stone stains. It worked like a charm.

  • Many restored and classic cars were on display at Eagle Fun Day. So many shiny things in the sun!

  • False Idols.

  • I came across another small framed print of Mary Theresa Rock 1861-1945 while digging through the remaining items in my father's house. Mary was my grandmother Helen's mother. Mary died years before I was born. When I was a child my grandmother Helen wasted a lot of time trying to get me interested in family history. None of us shared her fascination with the nondescript dead and frankly, we suspected her motives. People interested in lineages are often obsessed with how "society" views them. I didn't give a shit as a kid and I give even fewer shits now. So why do I fuss over old photographs of dead people that absolutely nobody cares about? Part of the answer is that I enjoy scanning and restoring old photographs but that's not entirely why I do this. It turns out we all have interesting backstories and family histories. Pick the most boring person on Earth and start looking into where they came from and I guarantee you will find much that interests you.

  • Another recently found snapshot of my grandmother Hazel sitting on a car in 1931. Taken around the time Gert and Hazel were married and a few years before the birth of my mother.

  • Indonesian stick dolls.

  • When the light is right any landscape can put on a worthy show.

  • Reading to Helen in our Glenburnie Ontario house around 1989. Note that I am reading the Three Little Pigs a classic "othering" tale about pinky white pigs enduring home invasions by a big bad black wolf. Of course, only the industrious, (not on welfare or looking for handouts), pig foils the rapacious wolf. And, you thought it was a harmless little children's story; woke up people!

  • Looking west toward the California side of Lake Tahoe.





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